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Articles and Knowledge

Posted by PRIZM 
Articles and Knowledge
February 02, 2006 04:02PM


Guys can you put your articles/interviews and random stuff in this thread, I appreciate the sharing, but we need to keep the forum tidy so I created this thread so you can put your thoughts, copied and pasted stuff and whatever else you want to into this section.

peace

P



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/02/2006 04:05PM by PRIZM.
Re: Articles and Stuff
February 02, 2006 04:03PM


HISTORY OF POPPING AND LOCKING
History of Popping and Locking

It was the robots on TV shows in the early '60s like "Lost in Space" that inspired the black kids in Los Angels to invent the dance the Robot. I don't think mime was as great an influence, after all, how many live shows has Marcel Marceau done in Watts?

Obviously mime was inspirational in the development and perfecting of the Robot. The sense of animation and futurism is strong in most poor inner-city kids because it's an escape to a world where everything is perfect, sharp, and in control. The hydraulic movements of the robot danced to music which was becoming more and more mechanically rhythmic, like James Brown's "Goodfoot" (1969), was a natural development in Los Angeles, a city of major street dance creations.

In 1969, a young black man by the name of Don Campbell was becoming known among street dancers in Los Angeles for inventing a dance called the Campbellock (he put out a record called "Do the Campbellock"). Don Campbell took the hydraulic robotic movements, which were all about total control and mixed it with wild, out of control body movement dances of the tap-flash dance days plus exact stop and start movements and spiced it all with comic facial expressions and clown-like costumes to develop a whole new dance movement which is still going strong called "Locking" (Campbellocking to us old guys. I lived in L.A. when it first came out and was a pretty good Campbellocker myself.)

The best way to describe the movement of locking would be thus: You know those little-figured toys that are like inside-out puppets on small plastic circular platforms or pedestals, and if you press the bottom of the platform the figure collapses real fast, then when you let your finger up it goes back into shape? Well that's what locking looks like. The body moves out of control then back into control snapping into position, collapsing then snapping back.
By the Early '70s Don Campbell had put together a whole crew of lockers called "The Lockers." One of the lockers was Shabadoo, the star of "Breaking," and Penguin, who was the chubby locker named "Rerun" on the TV show "What's Happening." The lockers of the early '70s wore platform shoes, loud striped socks, pegged pants that stopped at the knees, bright colorful satin shirts with big collars, big colorful bow ties, gigantic Apple Boy hats, and white gloves.

Around that time a known TV choreographer named Toni Basil, who was famous for shows like "Shindig," and "Hullaballoo," discovered Don Campbell and his Lockers and helped bring them to international fame. She was an incredible dancer herself and soon learned to lock. She became a member of The Lockers, helped develop their dance act, and got them on TV shows like "Saturday Night Live" and commercials such as Schlitz Malt Liquor Beer (the one with the bull).

I remember seeing her and Don Campbell dance live at a nightclub called Crenshaw Flats in Los Angeles. I was blown away. She was actually better than he was!

Also around the time "Soul Train" hit the air (1972) and it became an instant media hit by featuring street dancers, especially The Lockers, of Los Angeles. The nightclub Crenshaw Flats the apartment on Crenshaw Boulevard in Los Angels was where the "Soul Train" gang hung out.

At the time breaking was developing in New York, locking the The Robot were getting popular in southern California. During 1972 and '73 in Fresno, California, a small city halfway between Los Angeles and Dan Francisco, a black family of all boys were inventing something new of their own. They called their dance the Electric Boogaloo. Pistol Pete (who also starred in the film "Breaking" and was involved with Toni Basil and The Lockers and "Soul Train" in the early days) and his brothers had created The Electric Boogaloo by combining locking. The Robot, and the more smooth and controlled movements of mime. Instead of throwing their bodies in and out of control like locking, or in total hydraulic control like The Robot, they passed energy through their bodies popping and snapping elbows, wrists, necks, hips and just about all the body joints along the way. Electric Boogaloo was more like mime in the sense that it pantomimed a live wire of electrical current, but it still needed the control of The Robot to give it style. The Electric Boogaloo became big in San Francisco even before it hit Los Angeles but when it did hit L.A., the TV capital of the world, it was introduced through "Soul Train" as the new dance form and challenged the popularity of locking. The Electric Boogaloo (or Electric Boogie as it's called now) has since spread to New York as breaking later hit Los Angeles. It's interesting to see breaking and locking existing in the same sub-cultures. I think it's partly because they complement each other as opposites. The Electric Boogie is in control and tends to imitate the movements of nature like a lightning bolt or a rippling river, whereas breaking is more out of control and anti-nature or anti-gravitational like a flying saucer. Another reason they're done together with the same kids may also be that they're both competitive dances where dancers battle each other to determine who's best. "If my breaker can't beat you, my boogie can." They live in the same competitive atmosphere.

Because of its competitive nature, I see Electric Boogie also becoming a competitive sport. This might seem odd because unlike breaking, it's hard to judge, but it will go the way of breaking because they have become inseparable in a cultural dance movement. It will evolve into a competitive thing.

Written by Michael Holman in early 80s.
Re: Articles and Stuff
February 02, 2006 04:04PM


10 Bboy Rules
Mr.Freeze of RSC

1.Show people respect.
2.Learn your B-Boy history.
3.Keep your moves on beat.
4.Learn all your foundations.
5.Don't just do Flaire and Headspins.
6.Always be ready to battle.
7.Always Up Rock before you go Down.
8.Always hold your freezes for at least 1.5 seconds.
9.Do not steal moves unless the inventor gave you permission to use his move.
10.Always represent B-Boys as a positive role model no matter where you go in this world
Re: Articles and Stuff
February 02, 2006 04:05PM


KEN SWIFT (ROCK STEADY CREW / NYC)

Due to his original style and technique, Ken Swift is one of the most respected and rated B-Boys ever to walk this earth. An architect and master of original style, Ken Swift is one of the fast flowing sources from which this amazing dance style sprung. Get your cups ready `cus the source is about to flow once more.

A lil' history about who I am?
A lil' history of Ken Swift.
Firstly , my name was Kid Zoom, when I was with the Young City Boys. Then it was Ken Rok, Ken Ski for the Rock Steady Crew battle at the Lincoln Centre, when I was partners with Lil' Lep. Then after that it was Prince Ken Swift, and now it's just Ken Swift.

My history dates back to `78 at a time when you didn't really see it. And when you did see it, you'd be walking down the street and you wouldn't know what was happening, nobody on the outside world knew what was happening in that park, in that lil' circle next to a lil' sandpit, next to a monkey bars. They had loud music, but they didn't know why people was standing in that circle. Well the masses didn't, but in that circle, there was people getting busy, there was people doing stuff on the concrete, to the beat of the music, acting like clowns, acting like stick-up kids, acting like machines, acting like...B-Boys.

It was about being the best. Better than the other dancers. Dancing to the beat, and making the crowd respond. But it was about playing with the crowd, doing crazy shit.
The black kids were the ones that I learnt from but you never learned by asking somebody. Back in the days, it was machoism, it was about that street attitude, that attribute like you ain't gonna sweat nobody.

Who ever had the nerve to say "teach me", was considered a sucker, a lil' bitch-ass punk. So you never asked no one to teach you, you never clapped when a nigga did a good move, you just stood there and acted hard, like it didn't phase you. It was all about attitude, everyone else did the clapping, not the B-Boys.
Because it wasn't about clapping, it wasn't no fucking show, it was dancing, "I'm doing what I do". So you had to hold your own, you had to learn on your own from what you saw, and you had to be original, `cos if you did what you saw you'd be disrespected. You could even get smacked sometimes if you did someone else's move back in the day. So you had to do your own shit and you had to learn the foundation, and flipping it right.

For me it wasn't about making the crowd happy, `cos they didn't know what I was doing anyway. I wanted the B-Boys to say "alright". For me it was like I wanted to please my crew, I wanted my crew to say "Ohhhhh". So I didn't show them none of my shit until a party, or until the jam or until the battle, and I pulled off some crazy shit and I gave confidence to them and they didn't know it because I would do something in front of them and hype them up to do something. You know I was a beginner and I had a lot to prove you know. I wanted to be up there with the best kids, and I wasn't as good as them, that's all there was to it. So you know, it took me a while, but I started feeling it, and I really started loving it you know. I really loved Breaking man.

Who would you say is your main influence?
There is no main influence. The main influence for me is the music. OK now, as far as persons are concerned there are a whole number of people who influenced me. Some of the main ones were a kid named Grego, from the Executioners, a crew from East Harlem, there was a kid named Shaky, a Puerto Rican kid from Amsterdam Projects, 61st St. There was also the Number One Sure Shot Crew, with Kid Terrific, he's a Puerto Rican B-Boy and they inspired me more `cos all I saw was brothers, but when I saw Puerto Ricans I felt more confortable about Breaking.
My old brother Speedy, my middle brother Tumir, he's a Graffiti artist from the mid 70's to 80's and he also put me onto the underground scene. Then there was Eddy Ed, Kid Spark, who was down with Rock Steady back in `83, he was my inspiration for Brooklyn Rock.

Later on down the line, there was Maurizio, who was like the second wind. He inspired me. Not only `cos I liked what I saw, but I felt like...tarnished. Like "I'm bad too!". So he pushed me more to get better.

He got down with Rock Steady. He got busy, made his appearance in New York, and fucking blew everybody out of the water, and I felt that I was so wack, that day. But I knew what I had to do. After seeing him, I knew what the journey was gonna be. I said it's gonna be a hard and long journey, but I'll do it. It took me three years, and I did it. It took me three years to find my swerve, my feel.

Why are you retiring, and from what?
I'm retiring from performing on stage.
I don't think that my dance gets the respect that it deserves, I've tried for many years to educate people, and I've tried in the scene to educate people. A lot of young kids are pretty ignorant.
There's certain people out here that don't know how to pioneer things, and they feed distorted messages to young people. Then there's people who are jealous of pioneers, original dancers, so that then they try to send fucking mixed messages and rumours...and it's corny.

You know I'm 32 years old, I'm not a lil' kid any more. I could put up with that when I was 17 or 18, `cos I was part of it, but as you get older, you see it, and you try to tell the kids, you know? Teach them about self respect, as a person, not as a B-Boy. Because you can't be a respectable B-Boy, if you're not a respectable person. I think I got a good rapport with people in the scene because I try to be respectful. That's because I learned how to respect myself in the last 7 to 8 years, I learned a lot about myself and I'm still learning. To me it's about self-respect, and treating people right. And even if niggas shit on you and fuck you over, it's about staying righteous. Because everybody has their days. Me and you and everything we do in our life, we gonna pay for it some way or another, good and bad.

So my choice, it's not everybodys choice, I choose to do the right thing. I wanna do the right thing, for me, first. It may sound selfish, but that's the way I look at it, `cos I need to be happy. And this decision for me, is not bad, it's for a variety of reasons, but I think it's a celebration. It's beautiful that I had a career 20 years long, and it's beautiful that I went up and down on the street, through trials and tribulations and work, blood, sweat and years, and I can say right now, that I'm performing on stage with some of the top dancers in the world, and I'm getting the applause and getting the respect, as a B-Boy, in the scene now, not just a pioneer from Wildstyle. I'm getting the respect `cos I'm showing that I still got a lil' something under my sleeve, and to me, that means more than anything.

As a B-Boy, you gotta deal with the good and the bad in this game. You can have a great day in physical shape, and a fucked up floor, and if you don't know how to adjust to the medium, forget about it.

I'm happy `cos I'm here, I'm not hurt, I had fun with the fellas. I think every B-Boy isn't satisfied. You'll always feel you could do better, but I had fun tonight, and I think it's beautiful. People should learn, and try to have a vision for the future of my career. They can say he's not only a dancer that got a lil' fame, but he also was a person that went through the street, and dealt with human things; family, peer group, corporation, anything. I'm a father also and I think it's beautiful that after 20 years, I stop.
I'm not gonna perform on stage no more, but I'll always be a B-Boy, and there's always gonna be someone out there that could push my buttons, or some music that can push my buttons, and there's a time when I have no control of myself, and I need to break. Not that I plan it, it's like yo, I hear shit, I don't give a fuck where I'm at. If I feel like spinning on my head, or doing a swipe or a 90 or freeze, I'll do it. But it's just that I'm making a transition in my life, and do something different.

Can you tell me what the `respect` is, that you think the dance is not getting?
There are so many negative connotations surrounding Hip Hop in general, first of all, with the gangster thing, and the drugs and the misogyny of women, and there's mixed messages going around. You know, out of all the original Hip Hop dances, and Funk dances like Locking, Popping and Boogaloo, I believe that Breaking is very agressiv, and very hard-edged, and I think that people are scared of you. I think that people who don't understand, when they see it, most of the time they're only seeing certain elements of it, so they don't respect it as a dance. They're looking at it as a fucking clown act, or a monkey, or a fucking court jester bouncing on his fucking head. And to me, that's has a lot to do with us, and the media, all combined, because it's about education.

Breaking involves powermoves, to acrobatics, to flips, footwork, freezes, toprock. These are all the ingredients that I think are integral to B-Boying. They all have to be there, I don't dislike any one of them. And the more you have, the better you are.
But what I think is that, you know sometimes people be spinning, and some guy's throwing himself in the fucking air on his back or something. And they look at it like...I don't think they wanna see the essence of what's happening. The person's actually hearing a beat, and expressing himself. I think it's saying, these people have this fucking energy, and they're just going crazy.

Is this negative view (of Breaking) there because there are very few masters or people who really feel the spirit when they break?
I think there's a lot of ignorance. I feel there's a lot of people that even know, but they're so fucking jealous of the original style. The original style is so beautiful, and so funky that it don't make the crowd go crazy but half of them fucking people don't know how to find their flavour.

They don't know how to really feel the beat. And I think, inside it bothers them, and they feel proud because maybe they can do something physically that's most probably gonna get the better crowd response because you got 500 ignorant people that don't know what real, true B-Boying is.

So they feel this power, and then when they educate the children, they're gonna tell'em about that (original style). They don't say listen, "before you learn how to walk, you need to crawl". They don't tell'em they should learn the foundation and learn all that bullshit, then that will prepare you, to go into the fucking next level; powermoves and airmoves and flips.

A lot of people just wanna say "fuck that, that shit is old school, it's wack, it's about this and that". Calling it whatever they wanna call it. Some of `em call it, they started coming up with some corny shit. Buckling up with fucking helmets, running everywhere with helmets strapped to their fucking backpacks. To me, it's straight fucking corny, and you can put it in the magazine like that. What happened to putting a lil' style, you know? If you cut the fucking very top off the helmet and stuck it in your baseball cap, maybe I'd respect you a lil' bit more. But hide this shit. Don't be flagrant. They just flagrant to put on a fucking helmet and buckle up!

Now the helmet to me, is very good for breakdancers that wanna learn headspins, because if you do it in the `lab` and use the helmet, it's gonna let you find your balance, it's gonna protect your scalp, and it may protect your fucking skull, who know's? I recommend the helmet in the lab.

But you go to a circle, and you got a community of people that are looking jiggy, and even the B-Boys wanna look fly, and you jump in a circle and you stop, and you buckle your shit, and then you just drop yourself right on to your fucking head and start spinning. To me, it's obvious that you either haven't been told, so I give ya the benefit of the doubt, or, you don't give a fuck what you heard, and you say "fuck all that other shit, I'm gonna do my thing."

And this is what I'm up against a lot. I'm up against people that come to me just because I like footwork, and try to ask me why do I dislike powermoves, and I'm like, `what!? I love powermoves, they're an important part of B-Boying. But I'm about C.B.S; Complete Breaking Style, you knowa'i'msayin?`

It's a complete style. Like you know if you gonna learn about throwing the pitch, you better learn to curve the knuckle, and all the fucking shit that goes into it, so you can throw everything. You know, why do you just wanna learn the fastball? You can get away with that shit half the time, but someones gonna smack the shit out the park when they catch it. If you're into challenging a drum to try to find that fucking connection with the record; That's B-Boying.

Rock Steady is a pioneering crew, we've laid the foundation whether people wanna accept it or not, people gotta give it up, move on and do their part for the hip hop world. We did our fucking part and still are, and there's still people complaining. Challenge yourself. To me, the main challenge, is no opponent. I'm the best challenge for me. To me now, I could win or lose, and that means nothing in a battle with an opponent. But winning to me is, dancing to the beat, in a circle, and leaving the circle saying, `I fucking ripped that record`. That to me, is winning.
The last year, I've been competing with myself. I've been competing with my ego, which is not good. Sometimes when I really have an ego, I try to compete with my ego to calm myself down and realise, I think I'm good, but there's mad motherfuckers out here that are incredible, and to accept that. But also know that, I got a lot of experience man. I may not be the most aggressive guy attacking people, but I can do a lil' battling knowa'i'msayin? I know how to hold mine's. This is the game of life. It's like, you could fucking be the baddest nigga in the world in the boxing ring, but if you get caught with that punch, you're our cold, and it's like Breaking. I like to be a lil' bit confident. Everybody had that thing inside of them that makes them feel like, "I can fuck with him, I can deal with him." And that's what kept me hungry, but I'd rather stop now. I wouldn't wanna stop when I get wack.

But are there enough forums for people to express themselves with that true spirit, and feel that original style? No one breaks on the street no more.

There's not a forum, there's community centres and all that shit, never mind that, `cos there's no better feeling than being in a club. Fucking lights dim, going in there and just having people look at you, and that energy is like a forcefield. In the practice hall you're not really gonna feel that adrenaline, and we need more clubs that allow people to break. They don't allow it `cos they think it's violent. But it's all in good fun, it's competition. You gonna learn a lot in life about winning and losing. And the B-Boy in the street battling and everything, it keeps you occupied, and it teaches you how to lose. You can't win until you know how to lose. When you can lose, take it, and go back to the drawing board, that's when you learn how to win.

How can Breaking in it's true form survive in this era? Surely the social, political and economic situation of the environment was important to it's coming about in the first place?
If you look at the social/economic situation in the late 50's, 60's and 70's in New York City. There were a lot of people migrating from Puerto Rico, and also coming from South America, Haiti, Jamaica, to the city. The Bronx was the ideal place, with lower rent, but then at the same time, there was a lot of people moving up there. There was 149th St., around 3rd Avenue, it was called Little Bronx, and at that time there was a whole situation where funding was really bad in the neighbourhoods. I think there was this landlord scheme where landlords were having people burn buildings down to get the money, and you would see rows and rows of blocks of all burnt buildings. These environments were things that kids came out to look at everyday. How you gonna be inspired? And when they heard the music, I think it kinda took'em away from that for that lil' moment, where they can enjoy a song or something. So you're looking at, no outreach programms, no community programms, later for you. So you're looking at kids that didn't have much to do. And the blessing of creativity, from the Almighty was bestowed upon all these people, not only in New York, but worldwide, to really find a way to make the day, try to occupy your time...And look what we did. It's incredible. Hip Hop alone is so powerful and we don't even recognise the power and energy that we trade with each other...and the world.
Uprock
February 02, 2006 04:06PM


Bushwick, Brooklyn, circa 1967-1968

Throughout the mid-60's and mid-70's; Brooklyn was home to many street gangs. Rubberband Man and Apache were all too familiar with these violent times, they grew up in the Bushwick area. They often hung around with the Devil Rebels and other local Brooklyn Gangs. Although they socialized within a dangerous circle of friends, getting into trouble was not their ultimate goal. They loved to dance; mainly to Soul and Funk music, and wanted to channel their energy and skill towards something new-so they created a new dance form called "Rocking".

Rubberband Man and Apache would dance on the street corners while listening to the radio. They used mixture of moves from Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Salsa, and later the Hustle. As the dance developed, body movements called "jerks" and hand gestures called "burns" would be added to imitate a fight against an opposing dancer. Rubberband Man and Apache morphed these dance styles, movements, and gestures together to create a unique and original street dance. Many gangs, and more specifically gang members, began to perform this dance. It became commonplace to see gang members hanging out in corners rocking against each other. Rocking became a competitive dance that caught on very quickly.

By the early 70's Rocking became a local dance, not just a "gang" dance. Many non-gang-related youths from around the area started to Rock. You could witness Uprocking at block parties, teen dances, and many other festive gatherings. A man by the name of "Crazy Rob" organized the first Rock Contests in existence. Competition was fierce and Brooklyn became a breeding ground for intense dance contests (or battles).The dance caught on so quickly, and had spread so widely, that the name had to be changed. The term "Rock" in a "Rock Contest" would confuse many "Rock Music" fanatics; they would show up expecting a "Rock concert". Mistaken as a rock & roll dance, "Rocking" became "Uprocking". It was the same dance with a different name.

The name change did not affect the rate of the dance's growth and popularity. Many young men were competing and many Uprock crews were organized. Crews like Touch of Rock, Nasty Rockers, Mysterious Rockers, MTC Jigabugs, Dynamic Spinners, Non Stop, Rockers, All Star Rockers, Symphony Rockers, IND Dancers, Supreme Rockers, Down to Rock, Fast Rockers, Disco Rockers, Fantasy Rockers, Just Begun Rockers, Romantic Rockers, Holy Rock Smokers, Lil Dave Rockers, Rock With Class, Universal Dancers, One On One Rockers, Touch of Class, Phazzic Rockers, Explosive Rockers, Floor Master Dancers, Out to Burn, Out to Rock, Born to Rock, Born to Burn, TNT Rockers, Incredible Rockers, Latin Timbales, Galaxy Rockers, Unique Rockers, and Majestic Rockers. This extreme number of crews lead to an extreme amount of competition.

Unfortunately fierce competition did not go without mishaps. Though many battles would end peacefully, several others did not. Rubberband Man's final battle ended in a violent outcome.

Rubberband participated in a dance battle, in which the opposing dancer's girlfriend was put up as a prize. Ultimately, Rubberband won the contest and claimed his prize. The jealous boyfriend shot Rubberband as he was leaving the dance club with his new "prize" girlfriend. It was a tragic ending, a true legend was lost, but the dance continued to live on.

Dynasty Rockers¹ Role in History of Uprock
Competition remained strong, and still more dance crews were organized. In 1973 Danny Boy (Danny Negron) and Carlos Perez created the legendary Dynasty Rockers. Manny Figueroa, Eddie Figueroa, Danny Boy and Carlos were the first Dynasty members. Eddie Figueroa learned how to "Rock" from Rubberband Man, and he passed the steps on to Papo, Clark, and Manny in tribute to the memory of Rubberband Man. Dynasty Rockers revolved around leading dancers like "Danny Boy", Carlos, Ralph, Tony, and Gary "Crumb". The popularity of the Dynasty Rockers grew; this gave way to several branches of the crew. The Junior Dynasty Dancers and Girl Dynasty Dancers were organized, and also uprocked on the scene. Not only did the Dynasty Rockers bring new skills to Uprocking, but they were the first non-gang affiliated crew to flash the word "Rockers" on their "Colors"(Colors were originally used to identify individual gangs). "We used shirts or jackets and put our crew name on the back in a circle formation. The shirts, jackets, and sweaters were our colors and the letters were our Rockers"-King Uprock.

Late 1970's through 1980's
By late 1970 Uprock had it¹s own identity as a serious dance form. There were dozens of crews in Brooklyn by this time. Uprock was taken very seriously by it's advocates. The high stakes for Battling often included money, women, bragging rights, and shirts, which was one of the highest stakes in a battle. If you lost your shirt you lost your nickname and your crew's name.

In 1980 the biggest title in Brooklyn was up for grabs. The title was "King Uprock". All the best Uprockers in Brooklyn came together to compete in one contest. The title was won by Ralph Casanova, who now holds the King Uprock title.

By the mid-80's and into the 90's Uprock began to wither down. (B-boying) breaking became more popular. Many Uprockers got married, acquired full time jobs, became B-boys themselves, or had other situations that took them out of the game. The only way that Uprock was present during this time was in a modified form called "Top Rock", which was done by B-boys. Top Rock was not the correct form of the original Brooklyn Uprock Dance, and in essence, Uprocking became dormant for a few years.

Making a Come Back
In the early-90s two B-boys (Numbers and Burn One) started a search for original Brooklyn Uprockers. They brought out legendary dancers like King Uprock, Clarkie, Lil Dave, Noel, Cuz, Buz, Duz, Diana, Danny Boy, Lil Ed, Lucan, Manny, Carlos, Jefferey, Gary Crums, Lil Tito, Lil Bebop, Gee, Disco Ed, Mr Loose, Rocky Nelson, Chino and other original Uprockers to help spread the true essence of the dance. These members have participated in several major Hip Hop events, such as Zulu Nation Anniversary and the B-boy Masters Pro-Am. The true pioneers are an essential element in the growth of this dance style.

Dynasty Now
Dynasty Rockers presently has seven members that are active in the Hip Hop community. Existing members are: King Uprock, Numbers, Break Easy, Seamstar, Danny Boy, New Danny Boy, and Antonio. King Uprock heads the crew as leader and teacher. He currently teaches classes in Brooklyn as well. Numbers and Danny (New Danny Boy) live in Las Vegas, Nevada. Seamstar is an active DJ in Florida, and Antonio currently lives in Switzerland. In 2002 Dynasty¹s Goal is to educate people about Uprock and bring it back into the street dance scene so that they can take it to the future and beyond
Crazy legs
February 02, 2006 04:06PM


Crazy Legs
www.rocksteadycrew.com

Richard "Crazy Legs" Col?, a b-boy since 1977 and veteran of Hip Hop culture, is one of the original members of the Rock Steady Crew and current president. His credits include many of the first Hip Hop tours in the early 80's, which set the foundation for what the culture has become.

He has been featured in such films as Flashdance, Beat Street, Wild Style and Style Wars as well as various television programs and music videos. He has appeared in television commercials and print ads for major corporations including Coke, Sprite, Verizon Wireless, Sean John, Averix and Nike. He participated in the Peabody Award-winning documentary Dance in America: Everybody Dance Now, the Great Performances 20th Anniversary Special, and co-produced the documentary movie The Freshest Kids.

As a member of the Rock Steady Crew, Crazy Legs has performed in a tribute to the Nicholas Brothers at the Kennedy Center Honors, the Royal Variety Performance for Queen Elizabeth II, the Boston Ballet Gala, and in the Lincoln Center Serious Fun! series. He won the 1991 Bessie Award for Choreography and the 1994 Hip Hop Pioneer Award from The Source magazine.

He was inducted into the Hip Hop Hall Of Fame in 2002, was presented with the Source Youth Foundation 2003 Image Award, the 2003 AARTS Award from the Bay Shore Schools Arts Education Fund, and was also honored as the National Godfather of the 2003 Jersey City Puerto Rican Day Parade.

Other career highlights include his role in the Off-Broadway play Jam On the Groove, working with Savion Glover, and teaching John Leguizamo to b-boy for his Tony Award-nominated play Freak. He has choreographed music videos for Wyclef Jean (which was nominated for an MTV Award for Best Choreography) and multi-platinum artist Moby.

He and some of the other members of Rock Steady Crew were the first B-boys to perform at Carnegie Hall on Jan 19, 2001. Along with the Rock Steady Crew, Crazy Legs has toured extensively throughout the U.S., Japan, Australia, South America and Europe.

Crazy Legs hosts and organizes the annual Rock Steady Anniversary, a monumental community event that honors deceased members of the crew and celebrates Hip Hop culture both past and present. The Rock Steady Anniversary attracts deejays, B-boys/B-girls, emcees, writers and thousands of Hip Hop supporters from all around the world. The group also holds an annual Celebrity Basketball Tournament during the Anniversary Celebration that raises money for the Greenwich Village Youth Council in New York. In 2003, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proclaimed July 26th to be ?Rock Steady Crew Day? in New York City during their 26th Anniversary Celebration at Pier 54.

When his schedule allows, he volunteers by teaching the art of B-boying and participating in several community outreach programs and workshops. It was his dance program at the Point C.D.C. for young people in the South Bronx that garnered him the ?New Yorker of the Week? Award from New York 1 News.

2004 will be a monumental year for Crazy Legs. He recently signed endorsement deals with Red Bull Energy Drink and FILA Sportswear, and is the first B-boy to get a sneaker company to honor a group like Rock Steady Crew. FILA will debut the ?Rock Steady Crew 77? sneaker in April. Additionally, the City of Las Vegas awarded the Rock Steady Crew the Key to the City on February 21st, and proclaimed that day to be ?Rock Steady Crew Day? in Las Vegas.

Crazy Legs is the president of Backspin Productions, an entertainment company with the mission is to continue to produce Hip Hop events and eventually become a major entertainment company. Crazy Legs' success is a testament to the longevity of Hip Hop culture.
Style
February 02, 2006 04:07PM


WHAT IS "STYLE" ?

Style - [stail] - characteristic speciality to express, formulate something.

Nowadays when you go to a party you can see a lot of young and new dancers but there are hardly any new moves and ideas around. A lot of things are copied and taken over and sometimes you can even witness an imitation of a whole dance character (1:1- copy of a well known dancer) !
But such imitation and copying is in discrepancy to the main purpose and thought of Breaking (and the Hip Hop culture in general): creativity. The idea is to bring new input into the scene by presenting your own ideas and creations and with your skills you help to develope the culture and to bring it to the next level.

In the past the engagement with the dance, the experimentation with and the creation and developing of your own moves worked in a way that you took some idea, some inspiration or something which already existed and you worked on it and changed it into your own creation and added your own flavour to it. The influences were coming from a lot of other dance styles and even also from (eastern) material art mov(i)es. Like that everybody was creating and shaping an own dance character on which every dancer worked and which was the key that people were recognizing a dancer again in the circle although they maybe hadn't known him personally. One was also speaking about the "style" of a dancer.

But nowadays regarding Breaking the word "style" is more and more set equal to steps and gimmicks and seperated from the acrobatical moves of the dance. People distinguish between so called "powermoves" and "styles". This is nothing but wrong!
Apart from the fact that the so called "powermoves" actually aren't requiring that much power when they are well done because they base mainly on drive and technique, "style" isn't just footwork and dancing finesse but it is the whole expression of a dancer. Because everbody is actually expressing his own personal character through the dance and thus gives his personal note to every move. And because of that the same move (also a "powermove") looks different when done by different persons. Likewise it doesn't seem to make any sense if the acrobatical and the dancing elements of Breaking are seperated because the whole picture and appearance of a dancer with all details and every single move is how people will keep him in mind and also recognize him again.

Unfortunately a lot of stuff done in the circles and on the dancefloors are looking nearly the same nowadays. A wider variation and thus an augmented quest for something different and own would be really desirable. Also because this would help the development and level of Breaking as there would be much more inspiration around.

To develop an own "style" without adapting other dancers stuff is a hard way. But the ones who are imitating instead of innovating will always be steps behind because during the time they try to copy a move, the others are already on new skills and drills. And apart from the fact that with "biting" one can never be the best, one gets recognition only for a short time and one will be forgotten fast again, one rather rips off than really helps the culture. But if you are doing your own stuff nobody can be better in that as it is something different and new which is nobody else doing and with that you are also inspiring again other dancers for doing things that might inspire you again!
Focus Flo Mo
February 02, 2006 04:07PM


Focus Interview at bboyworld.com



Could you state your name, crew, where u from etc...


B-boy Focus, birth name Jussi Sirviö. I live in Jyväskylä, Finland, and been representing Flow-Mo Crew since 2002.



Whats the bboying scene like where your from?


Well my town is pretty small, so there aren't that many dancers in here. Few guys are pretty good, a few coming up pretty fast. As far as Finland, the Finnish b-boying is coming up really fast. A lot of cats are really concentrating on footworks and dancing on beat without doing all the trendy moves and stuff. Ya'll better watch out . Unfortunately there aren't really international jams in Finland at the moment. Freestyle Session is propably coming here during the spring so that's about to change I hope..



When did you start dancing?


I started dancing in the year 1995.



Could you describe your style?


My style... I do a lot of footworks, but I try to be a complete b-boy. I try to master everything, ups, footworks, powermoves, freezes. I base my style on foundation but try to be creative at the same time and mix everything in it from powermoves to big and very small tricks and keep it all on beat.



So how much/long do you practice?


I practise usually six days a week and about three hours a day.



Whats your favourite track to dance to?


Not really thee song, there's like thousand of them. Sometimes if I practise alone and the beats are dope they make me so hype I just have to press pause, chill for a while and then continue again. I practise to a lot of funk breaks, and uptempo rap does it's thing aswell. I still think the classic joints like just begun and black belt jones are best songs ever made.



What has been your most enjoyable bboying experience?


If I have to mention one I think it must be a battle against K-mel, Remind, Storm and Speedy in Norway last spring. It was cool to battle the guys I've always looked up to. But in general it's allways nice if you get invited or just go to a jam abroad and you get treated like an artist. The society doesn't really consider us dancers or artists but thank God b-boys themselves do.



What has been your least enjoyable bboying experience?


The injuries. Mine ones and the ones my friends have had. They can bring the most gifted dancer down in a moment...



Do you have any goals or ambitions you want to achieve in the future?


We've got a lot of plans for the future. We'll propably do a new b-boy theathre piece during the summer. But basically I just wanna hit all the jams near and far and battle more and more. I hope, or i know Finland will be more recognised among the b-boys worldwide.



Any bboys you imperticularly want to battle in the future or like to see battle each other?


The dopest battle would be K-mel versus Flea or Flow Master versus Maurizio or Wicket vs Ken Swift or Ivan versus the world.



Whats your opinion about bboyworld?


It's really cool to get footage in allmost real-time. It also gives you a chance to get footage that you wouldn't get any other way. But I still support the event promoters and buy my videos. Not so many people do that which is kind of sad.



Shout outs?


Thanks to my girlfriend and my crew for inspiration and support: d'Maestre, Taya and Wartecs in Helsinki, Ata in Oulu, Juuso, Jani and Pasi in my town and Lisa in Los Angeles. Shouts to Riski Clique, Rytmisektio, taukojalka.com, Jussi K and K-Mo. Sweden: Moves Per Minute, Marre, Mauro, Damon, Beefnoodles and Dennis Da Menace. Darkmarc, Diaz, Parkes and Atomic B-boys in Norway. Bag Of Trix, K-Mel, Lamine, To The Beat organization, all my students, bboyworld staff and Cros One for making the Freestyle Session tour. Flow-Mo 2004 babiie!!!!!
Ken Swift
February 02, 2006 04:08PM


Re: Articles and Knowledge
February 03, 2006 01:16AM


From [www.mighty4.com] . Break DJ Leacy RIP!!!!

"BREAK-DJ LEACY"......31 YEARS OF AGE......LONDON TOWN........FIRST NATURE SOUND SYSTEM, FOUNDATIONZ, MOVES-PER-MINUTE(SWEDEN), UNIVERSAL ZULU NATION........STARTED DJing in 1988.

Whatup Leacy, how'd you get into this thing called Hip Hop?

MY OLDEST BROTHER HAD A RECORD COLLECTION,HE WOULD LET ME CHECK IT .MOST OF THE MUSIC HE HAD WAS ROCK (A LOT OF B-BEATS !!!!!!!!! ), BUT THERE WAS ALSO NEW WAVE AND OTHER NON-MAINSTREAM MUSIC TYPES OF THE DAY Inc 12"s LIKE "BUFFALO GIRLS" Etc. ALL THIS SHIT WAS APPEALING AND I WANTED MORE !!!!!!!
ELSEWHERE, I GOT MY FIX THE USUAL "EARLY HIP HOP IN EUROPE" WAY (ie:
WILDSTYLE, STYLE WARS, Etc). BUT IT WASN'T UNTIL ABOUT 85/86 WHEN I GOT HOLD
OF SOME "BAMBAATAA LISTS"......STARTED TO COLLECT JOINTS AND SAVE FOR 1200's !

Who are your inspirations and influences within Djing?

JAZZY JAY, LOUIE LOU, FLASH, BAM, HERC, THEODORE, CHEESE, WHIZZ KID (R.I.P), GRANDMIXER DST, CHASE & TONY TONE, AFRIKA ISLAM, JAZZY JOYCE & ALL THEM EARLY NYC B-BEAT DJ's.........MORE LOCALLY HOWEVER, I DREW MY INSPIRATION FROM THE LONDON SET - PERSONAL PREFERANCES OF THE TIME BEING ...........SKYE, PACE, DEXTER, STREETS AHEAD, NUCLEUS, MO ROCK, KANZ (R.I.P), QUICK CUT
JAY, MASTERMIND CREW and OTHERS.

Do you get down with any other aspects of Hip Hop Culture?

I WAS BREAKIN' FOR A WHILE.

Hands down across the world the B-boys and girls love the tracks you get
downon, where do you get inspired to play the shit you play?

ALL THEM B-BOYS/B-GIRLS WHO REACT ON THE BREAK.

Who are some Breakbeat DJ's out today that you are currently feeling?

SKYE......NUCLEUS........JAZZY JAY........LOUIE LOU..........J-ROCC.

What advice would you give to aspiring Breakbeat DJs?

STOP BITIN' .

How large is your vinyl collection?

FUCKING BIG

How does it feel to be asked questions every day daily from people saying
"what song did you play at this event etc.?" im sure it must get irratating ahahhaaha

THE QUESTION REVEALS THE ANSWER !

What has been some of the illest B-boy event / jams you've ever played for?

THE STATESIDE EVENTS ARE ALWAYS DOPE ......ESPECIALLY PRO AM. BATTLE OF THE YEAR IS AN INCREDIBLE EXPERIENCE (particularly 2000), BATTLE ROYAL WAS SPECIAL TO ME.

What was the dopest battles you've ever seen in your opinion?

IN MY OPINION (and for different reasons !!!)..................ALTHOUGH I'VE
SPUN FOR A LOT OF HOT BATTLES, I DON'T ACTUALLY SEE THAT MUCH.......HEAD DOWN-IN THE MIX-CONCENTRATIN' & ALL THAT........SO I'M ONLY SPEAKING ON BATTLES I'VE SEEN FROM BEGINING TO END AS PART OF THE CIIRCLE LOOKIN' IN,
SUCH AS.................................
BATTLE OF THE YEAR '95 - FAMILY v ENEMY SQUAD and OUT OF CONTROL v FLYING STEPS................B-BOY SUMMIT '96 - STYLE ELEMENTS/FLOOR ROCKERS v ROCKSTEADY (THAT WAS THE LIVING SHIT !!!!)........FLOMASTER v STEP FIENDS @ ROCKSTEADY PARK .......FLIPS / ABSTRACT v BENJI @ PRO AM..........BATTLE ROYAL 99 - VIETNAM v BENJI.................+ SHITLOADS MORE !!!!!!!!!!!

This year at the Mighty 4 5th Year Anniversary, M4 is proud to present you
with a Mighty 4 Appreciation award recognizing your vicious Breaks skills
and longetivity throughout the years, what are your thoughts upon receiving this
award?

I'M TRULY HONOURED.....................TO RECIEVE ANY KIND OF ACCOLADE IS
FANTASTIC.......BUT WHEN IT'S FROM YOUR PEERS' IT'S REAL SPECIAL !!!!

Not too long ago you pressed your first record with classic Leacy breaks,
any plans on dropping more of these?

YEAH........BREAKSPLOITATION volume 2 THIS SUMMER !!!!!!!

You got anything else lined up as far as projects?

MORE MIXTAPES........BREAKSPLOITATION vol 2..........LOADS OF NEW BREAKS TO
BREAK !!!

Hit up the shouts list ! Pro-Am 2002 Info

AIDAN ORANGE, ANA MARIA. RYZEE RYZE, DUCE, SPIKEY SHARP, NUCLEUS, SKYE, KAMA, MOVES-PER-MINUTE, SANDRO, ORIGINAL PAULSKI +FOUNDATIONZ, MISTER DEXTER, SPEEDY LEGS, TRAILS, GREMLIN, KEN SWIFT + FAMILY, AIKO, POE ONE, THOMAS (B.O.T.Y), NITECRAWLA (MIAMI), WICKET, SPARTANIC, LENO + FLOORLORDS (BOSTON), POPSICLE (FIRST NATURE), CROS 1, HOOCH, ALL THE PEOPLE WHO SUPPORT
OUR TAPES+LPs AND EVERY BODY THAT LIKES THE SHIT I PLAY....................................
Re: Articles and Knowledge
February 03, 2006 11:17PM



Current mood:
deeeep shitt man..............
MR wigglesssssss.biz
February 18, 2006 01:44PM



Current mood:
KEN SWIFT
February 26, 2006 05:37PM



Current mood:
Knowledge part 1
March 07, 2006 11:00PM



Current mood:
1 THE WORD "BREAK DANCE" NEVER EXISTED, IT'S A MEDIA TERM THAT THEY CAME UP WITH .

THE ORIGINAL NAME WAS BBOY (meaning break boy, beat boy, or bronx boy)

2 "BREAK DANCE" WAS USED BY "GANGS" INSTEAD OF FIGHTING

HELL NAAAAA!!! SH#T WE GOT INTO MORE FIGHTS FROM BREAKING THAN ANYTHING. THAT WAS A MEDIA HYPE STORY THAT WE AS YOUNG BBOYS( WHO NEW THE TRUTH ) EVEN FELL FOR. DEFINITELY FAR FROM THE TRUTH.

3 A YOUNG KID BROKE HIS NECK AND DIED DOING A HEAD SPIN

SHOW ME PROOF AND ILL TAKE THIS ONE OFF!!!!
IT'S AN OBVIOUS DETERRENT FOR PARENTS WHO DIDN'T APPROVE OF THERE KIDS DOING THIS DANGEROUS GHETTO DANCE FORM.

4 BBOYING WAS TAUGHT TO A GROUP OF YOUNG LATINOS BY A CAPOERA MAESTRO IN THE 70'S
(CAPOEIRA IS A FORM OF MARTIAL ARTS, CREATED BY AFRICAN SLAVES AND DISGUISED AS A DANCE IN BRAZIL)

WHILE I DO AGREE THAT BBOYIN WAS INDIRECTLY INSPIRED BY THIS AFRICAN ART FORM. AND BBOYING DEFINITELY HAS ITS ROOTS IN AFRICAN DANCE. BUT I HAVEN'T MET A LATIN BBOY FROM BACK IN THE DAYS THAT CAN EVEN PRONOUNCE THE WORD CAPOEIRA. (MAN I CAN'T EVEN SPELL IT)
THE STORY THAT BEST SIZES THIS ARGUMENT UP WAS A QUESTION POSED TO TWO OF OUR FOUR FATHERS OF BBOYIN "THE NIGGA TWINS",
WHEN ASKED WHY DON'T YOU GUYS ( THE NIGGA TWINS ) GIVE CREDIT TO CAPOEIRA??? AND THERE REPLY WAS. I NEVER MET THIS GUY CAPOEIRA THAT YOUR TALKIN ABOUT BUT IF YOU BRING HIM TO ME ILL SEE IF I RECOGNIZE HIM.

5 THE 6 STEP AND THE 4 STEP ARE THE ONLY FOOTWORK STYLE FROM BACK IN THE DAYS

NOPE, THE 6 STEP IS ALSO NOT THE ONLY ORIGINAL FOUNDATIONAL FOOTWORK, THERE ARE TONS, SEE THE "BBOY MOVE FILES".

6 VIDEO DANCERS ARE HIP HOP DANCERS (IE, DANCERS IN INSYNC, BACKSTREETBOYS,AND OTHER VIDEOS LIKE THAT ECT.)

HELL NAAAAA!!!!. UNTIL THESE WATERED DOWN JAZZ DANCERS DO ALL OF THE THINGS I LISTED BELOW. THEY WILL NEVER BE HIP HOP DANCERS.
A) CREATE THE MOVES THAT THERE DOIN INSTEAD OF BITING THEM FROM REAL HIP HOP DANCERS.
B) GO TO REAL UNDERGROUND HIP HOP CLUBS AND BATTLE LIKE THE REST OF US, AND PAY DUES.
C) STOP TRYING TO LEARN OUR DANCES IN THESE FAKE STUDIOS.
D) UNTIL THEY AT LEAST LISTEN TO HIP HOP MUSIC AND AND LIVE IT.
AS FAR AS IM CONCERNED THESE DANCERS ARE MOSTLY JAZZ DANCERS THAT LEARNED FAKE HIP HOP DANCES IN THESE STUDIOS. AND COULD GIVE 2 SHITS ABOUT OUR CULTURE "HIP HOP"!!!.

7 BREAKING AND HIP HOP DANCE ARE TWO DIFFERENT THINGS

WRONG!! BREAKING IS AN ORIGINAL HIP HOP DANCE. ALONG WITH ROCKIN, PARTY DANCE, FREESTYLE (CLUB) DANCE;

8 POPPIN AND LOCKIN ARE A PART OF HIP HOP DANCE

TECHNICALLY POPPIN AND LOCKIN HAVE THERE OWN HISTORY THAT EXISTED BEFORE THEY EVER NEW WHAT HIP HOP WAS. THERE MOVEMENT WAS BASED MORE ON WEST COAST FUNK. BUT THE COLLABORATION OF THE TWO CULTURES CREATED A GREAT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BOTH COASTS. ESPECIALLY IN DANCE.

9 ROCKIN AND BREAKING ARE THE SAME DANCE

ROCKIN AND BREAKING EACH HAVE THERE OWN HISTORY. AND ARE FROM DIFFERENT SCHOOLS OF DANCE
BREAKING: COMES FROM MORE OF THE JAMES BROWN ERA AND FEEL.
ROCKIN: COMES FROM THE ORIGINAL NYC GANGS AND THEN THE DISCO ERA HAD A MAJOR INFLUENCE ON ROCKIN AS WELL AS JAMES BROWN.

10 THAT BBOY S BACK IN THE DAYS DRESSED BUMMY, WENT TO A JAM WITH A BACK PACK, AND WOULD BREAK ALL NIGHT IN A JAM

BACK IN THE DAYS THE ORIGINAL BBOYS WOUDL DRESS AS FLY AS POSSIBLE, AND PART OF THE FLAVA OF A BBOY WOULD BE HOW HE WOULD DO ALL OF HIS MOVES AND NEVER GET DIRTY.
ALSO WE NEVER SET OUT TO A JAM WITH A BACK PACK PREPARING TO DANCE ALL NIGHT.
BBOYS WOULD GO TO A JAM, DANCE WITH SOME FEMALES, SOCIALIZE, AND THEN WHEN THE RIGHT BREAK BEATS CAME ON, THEN WE WOULD GET DOWN, THEN AFTER WE GOT DOWN WE WOULD GET BACK TO PARTYING. THAT'S THE WAY IT WAS.

11 BREAKIN IS OR CAN BE A SPORT

NOPE. IT'S A DANCE, AND IF EVER IT SHOULD APEAR ON A SPORTS NETWORK OR OLYMPIC CATAGORY, IT SHOULD BE LISTED AS A DANCE, OR DANCE SPORT.

12 POWER MOVES STARTED IN CALI

UHUH. ALTHOUGH CALI CAN TAKE SOME CREDIT FOR HELPING TO ELEVATE POWER MOVES, BUT MOVES LIKE, FLARES, CONTINOUS FLARE, FLARE 90'S, HOLLOW BACKS, TAP HEAD SPINS, HEAD SPIN 90'S, AIR MOVES, AIR TRACK, AXELS (AIR FLARE), SWIRLS (DOUBLE ELBO SPINS), UFO'S, AND ALL THAT OTHER GOOD STUFF STARTED IN NYC.

13 THE WORD BREAK WAS TAKEN FROM A SLANG FOR THE LOCK IN LOCKING

THE WORD BREAK IN BBOY CAME FROM THE BREAK OF A RECORD (THE PERCUSION, OR DRUM SOLO IS CALLED A BREAK). THIS HAS BEEN A FACT SINCE THE EARLY 70'S.

14 OZONE AND TURBO WERE THE ACTUAL NAMES FOR THESE DANCERS IN THE MOVIES "BREAKIN" AND "ELECTRIC BOOGALOO"

NAAA..THERE REAL DANCE NAMES ARE
TURBO- IS REALLY SHRIMP
OZONE- IS REALLY SHABADOO

15 CARD BOARD BOXES
NO NON NO...WE NEVER USED TO BREAK ON CARD BOARD. ORIGINBAL BBOYS WERE ON STRAIGHT UP CONCRETE REPRESENTING, OR WOOD AND MARBLE FLOORS. THE WHOLE CARD BOARD THING CAME ABOUT IN THE EARLY 80'S AND WAS USED RARELY. MOSTLY FOR SPINNING. BY THIS TIME THE MEDIA BLEW THE WHOLE THING OUT OF PROPORTION AND TURNED IT INTO A CORNY GIMMICK.

16 BBOYS SHOULD BROOKLYN ROCK IN A BBOY BATTLE

UH, EXCUSE ME, BUT WHY DID YOU JUST TOP ROCK INTO A BROOKLYN ROCK AND THEN JUMP INTO AN AIRFLARE. BBOYS MUST FINALLY LEARN. "THEY ARE TWO SEPARATE DANCES", AND TO AN OG, IT MAKES NO SENSE TO THROW A BROOKLYN MOVE WHEN
A) THERE IS NO ONE BROOKLYN ROCKIN AGAINST YOU.
B) THERE ISN'T A BROOKLYN ROCK BEAT ON.
C) YOU DON'T EVEN KNOW HOW TO BROOKLYN ROCK.
THERE ARE WAYS OF FREESTYLE TOP ROCKIN WHERE YOU DON'T HAVE TO GO UP AND DOWN IN A BROOKLYN STYLE MOVEMENT.

17 BOYS WHO CAN'T UP ROCK CAN BEAT REAL UPROCKERS

NO! IM SORRY. JUST BECAUSE YOU SCORED A COUPLE OF POINTS AND MADE THE CROWD LAUGH. DOESN'T MEAN THAT YOU BEAT A KING UPROCK OR A KEN SWIFT. THERE IS A SAYING THAT ME AND MY BOYS MADE UP FOR THIS TYPE OF THOUGHT. IT'S CALLED "BURN WITH FINESSE" IN UPROCKIN YOU MUST LEARN THE DANCE FIRST, AND THEN LEARN HOW TO STRIKE AND BURN WITH STYLE, NOT JUST SWING WILD AND LOOK SLOPPY. ANY ONE CAN DO THAT.
Re: Articles and Knowledge
October 17, 2012 09:13AM


Like many of their peers, as standing in the entrance to life, I began to find their own universities. I am looking for is a beautiful place. There do not have much, but it should be very clean and tidy; seemingly plain, and Once inside they feel different. The teaching building is so people do love beads 2011 have to like a Gothic cathedral soaring sense, but as a thinker, a quiet and wise stand. The interiors are simple and bright, indifferent quiet urging them to put aside the distractions.
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